The Longest Revolution: Feminist Social Practice

Co-curators Neysa Page-Lieberman and Melissa Hilliard Potter

The Longest Revolution: Feminist Social Practice is a research, exhibition and publication project that positions the feminist art movement’s collaborative, inclusive, community-based and social-justice tenets as the primary influence on contemporary socially-engaged art. The Longest Revolution queries why the feminist narrative has been omitted from the evolving discourse on social practice, reframes the discussion on socially-engaged art with feminism at its core, and proposes a new feminist-centered theory for defining the field of social practice at large.                                                                                                                  

The Longest Revolution features:

Revolution at Point Zero, a focus exhibition at Open Engagement

Opening March 9 through April 24, 2017, Glass Curtain Gallery, Chicago

The Longest Revolution: Feminist Social Practice launches with a project-based exhibition called Revolution at Point Zero which is timed to run concurrently with the Open Engagement Conference in Chicago. The home base for Point Zero is at Columbia College, in the Glass Curtain Gallery and along the Wabash Arts Corridor, with accompanying partner programs happening around the city of Chicago. The exhibition and programming will galvanize a conversation on the feminist legacy and contributions to socially-engaged art through collaborations, conversations, performances and a full day symposium. The conversations reframe the discussion on socially-engaged art with feminism at its core, and propose a new feminist-centered theory for defining the field of social practice at large.

Point Zero will host several women-identified artists from around the US whose work focuses on themes of domestic, child and eldercare labor; human trafficking; racial and gender violence; healing through consciousness-raising, and more. These artists are exhibiting and performing their work at Columbia College and other partnering institutions throughout Chicago.

Artists and newly commissioned projects include Laura Anderson Barbata’s Julia Pastrana: A Homecoming, with collaborator Fem Appeal; Marisa Jahn’s The CareForce; Las Nietas de Nonó (Michelle and Lidela Nonó) Ilustraciones de la Mecánica/Illustrations of the Mechanics; and Megan Pitcher Young’s Longest Walk performance. Additional featured artists include Simone Leigh’s project, The Free People’s Medical Clinic, and documentation of events and performances as they transpire. A special section of the gallery will be devoted to illustrating the curators’ on-going research, writing and development of The Longest Revolution exhibition and publication (opening 2018) to build this crucial and long-overlooked feminist scholarship.